Wednesday, December 21, 2011

A Little Something Merry for Me!

Do you have a place in your home where you put things so you know you can find them later?  A place that holds all kinds of treasures that you can't find?!!!  That special place is holding many of my favorite things hostage, or playing a wicked game on me, because I can't find things I've deposited in that special place!  Namely, a favorite Christmas tablerunner, that, for the life of me, I cannot find this season!!  I sure wish I knew where it was!  I've been looking for weeks.  It's not packed with all of the other Christmas stuff because I remember having the wise idea that (because I love it so much) I'd like to get it out first thing next year...meaning this year, and so I put it in the "special" place so I could get to it easily.  Hmmmm.  That will teach me.  I'll probably find in in July.

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I bought myself a little something for Christmas and thought I'd share it with you.


1862 Battle Hymn

The wonderful fabrics you see in the photo are from Barbara Brackman's newest fabric collection (for Moda) 1862 Battle Hymn.  I'm just loving the prints, the colors....well everything.  The photos show some of my favorites, and I'm itching to cut them up and work with them.  I bought a few charm packs so I can cut them into hexies and tumblers right away.  I thought that you might like to see them, too.  To see the entire line, which is due in quilt shops in January,  click here

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On another note, if you're like me, then you like to read about what life was like in the eighteenth and nineteenth century, both fiction and non-fiction.  I'm reading (actually listening) to a wonderful book of historic fiction called The Kitchen House, written by Kathleen Grissom.  It tells the tale of a little immigrant girl who became indentured while making the voyage to the United States, and was brought to a plantation to work in the kitchen house in 1790.  She is raised by the women who work at the plantation.  I won't give any more details away so as not to spoil it for you, but know that the book is full of rich detail about what life was like back then.  Word on the web is that this book will be made into a movie!

If you like historic fiction, then you may enjoy The Widow of the South, a fictional book about the true life Civil War battle that took place in Franklin, TN. 

I've been told that the Wagon's West series by Dana Fuller Ross, is also wonderful historic fiction, although I haven't yet had a chance to begin reading those.



Do you have any recommendations for historic fictional books?  I'd love to hear from you!




5 comments:

  1. Oh My! I love historical fiction - Judith Pella has a wonderful Russian series; Brock and Bodie Thoene have numerous series that are riveting; these aren't hot off the press but they are well worth the read! I look forward to trying your suggestions and to see what others recommend!

    Your fabric is gorgeous - do you have a pattern in mind?

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  2. Those books sound great and thank you for sharing the information on them . I love reading anything about the Civil War….both fiction and non-fiction.

    I cannot wait to get my hands on that fabric line. It's so gorgeous!

    Merry Christmas to you and your family and I sure hope you find your tablerunner.

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  3. I read The Kitchen House and found it so haunting that I wasn't sure if I liked it or not. But because it gave me cause for reflection and revisiting long buried feelings, I can honestly say it is a book I highly recommend that each of you read. It will cause your heart to ache, you face to smile, your eyes to cry but you will come away with much food for thought and cause for your own inner reflection.

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  4. Jane Kirkpatrick writes wonderful historical fiction, much of it focusing on women. The Change & Cherish series is about Emma Giesy & the Aurora Colony. One of her quilts is at the Aurora Colony Museum in Aurora, OR. Check out her other books at www.jkbooks.com.

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  5. I read "The Kitchen House" last summer and I have to admit it made me ashamed that my forefathers could treat other human beings the way they did. It's a great book and if nothing else full of lessons on how not to treat others.

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