Friday, November 6, 2015

Pocket Patchwork Sew~Along: Tucker ~ Part Four

I know you're all anxious to meet Tucker, and I'm betting you're going to quickly scroll down to see what the finished results looks like, and I can't say I blame you.  I'd likely do the same.  

Now that you've had a first look....are you scratching your head?  Are you thinking....'this is the path she lead us down?'  Well....as I said from the beginning, Tucker wasn't to be my typical quilt design, but.....it was most definitely designed with a distinct purpose in mind!  I hope you'll keep an open mind as we finish Tucker, and I explain the method to my non-madness!

From the pieces you have left, you'll be making (8) Flying Geese units.  To construct them, draw a diagonal line on the wrong side of all light print squares.  Position a light print square on the left side of a dark print rectangle.  Sew just inside the drawn line, and press, checking the accuracy and placement of the light print triangle.  Then, trim a quarter inch seam allowance from the center and bottom fabrics.  Repeat on the right side. Make (8) Flying Geese units measuring 1 1/2" x 2 1/2" unfinished.

I used (8) Flying Geese units I had lying around.  Orphans, if you will.   

They were much, much larger than what I needed, so I used the Wing Clipper ruler to trim them to size

I love, love, love this ruler!  You can create Flying Geese units in sizes from 1 1/2" to 10 1/2" with this ruler, and trim them to perfection each and every time!!  Obviously, it also works to trim larger,m orphaned FG to any smaller size like I did.  

Notice the ruler's 2 1/2" vertical line on the left side light print, and where the line turns the corner, it travels horizontally to meet the seam allowance for the right side light print.  That shows your first cut.  Notice, also, that there is extra fabric above the pink goose point.  I trimmed that as well.  
 After trimming the first two sides, you rotate the FG unit, and trim the last two sides.  Absolutely perfect results every time.  You can't beat that!  Click here to read more about this ruler, and order one if you're interested.  

Here are all my trimmed Flying Geese.  
Now sew them into (4) sets of pairs.  Each pair should measure 2 1/2" x 2 1/2" unfinished.
Sew your pairs together to make (2) foursomes.  With small pieces like these are, the size of your pins is more important than ever!!  Thicker pins will distort your patchwork, and while thick pins are no good no matter what size unit you're making, the smaller the pieces, the more impact thick pins will have.  I love these fine patchwork pins and wouldn't use anything else!! If you'd like to know more about them, click here.
Your foursomes should measure 2 1/2" x 4 1/2" unfinished.  

Sew the (2) foursomes together for one long Flying Geese strip measuring 2 1/2" X 8 1/2" unfinished.
Sew the Flying Geese strip to the top of the star block; press.  Quilt should measure 8 1/2" x 10 1/2" unfinished.
Sew the remaining patchwork block to the Flying Geese strip; press.  Your little quilt should measure 8 1/2" x 16 1/2" unfinished.  
This is how my sweet, little Tucker turned out.  In finishing my Tucker quilt, I did not use batting, and did not quilt it in any way.  This was quite deliberate on my part as you'll see why shortly.  I just chose a backing print, and basted the top and back with big stitches.  Nice and easy!

I cut (2) 2" x WOF strips for double fold binding.  I normally cut my binding strips at 2 1/4", but because I didn't use batting, I didn't need the extra width.  So, keep that in mind when deciding the width of your binding.  You can certainly add batting and quilt yours if you prefer, but before you make that decision, read on.
Now that Tucker is done, it's time to show and tell you why I've named it Tucker.  
You may remember in my first post, that I said Tucker wasn't going to be my usual quilt design, and that I had been inspired my Mary Campbell Ghormley's vintage doll quilt collection at the International Quilt Study Museum in Lincoln, NE.  
A lot of the nineteenth century quilts collected by Mary don't have a block pattern or ordered design to them.
They were likely made of units, blocks and scraps the quiltmaker had laying around.
That didn't mean they were any less wonderful, and are certainly treasured now, not to mention are presently living in a museum!  

If you're a regular reader to this blog, you know how much I love early American history. These quilts touched me deeply as I imagined our quilting ancestors sewing the patches together for a child's doll.  No batting, no quilting, just love stitched for a little girl's happiness.  (Of course many had batting and quilting.)  Their living situation meant they had to be frugal, and wasted nothing.  Did they have any idea how charming these quilts would be to us? 

Inspiration struck with a solution to a desire I had been ruminating over for many months!!
I've been wanting to make a bunch of little quilts that I could tuck into several places here and there in my home.  Nothing fancy, not a lot of work, but pleasing and interesting, of course. Why it took visiting the International Quilt Museum and Mary's collection to spark the inspiration, I don't know?  I've learned not to question why, but to follow my instinct.  Having a little "tucker" quilt inside a Furkin was one place I had wanted one, and the missing batting helps with fitting the lid.  For a utilitarian quilt like this, batting and quilting is just not necessary.  What do you think? Will you miss the quilting stitches when you look at it, or just enjoy it the way it is?  For some of these little cuties, I know I won't miss them.  But, if you would, you should!
This is where Tucker will live in my house.  It's my lowly laundry room.  You know how much time we spend in there!  It's also a mud room for us, so we're in here all the time, entering from the garage and back yard, etc.  I want this little room to be a happy place, so I've decorated it to be just that.  It needed a quilt!  
Tucker is tucked into an old feed/grain scoop.  This handmade treenware tool has been with me for many years, and I love it.  The flowers are inside the compartment where all the feed/grain would have been collected.  There is another handle that the quilt is covering.  It has a lot of character, and no doubt spent many years in service to its owner.  What stories it could tell...if it only could!  It was the perfect place for a little quilt, but it had to be small and thin, or I thought it might overwhelm the scoop.  

Like you, I don't have a lot of time to piece all the things I want to make, but studying Mary's quilts made me realize that I could use orphans units and patchwork squares I already had laying around, and create something lovely without a lot of fuss.  

About the "tucked" part of Tucker....if I only had me to think about, I would have used more orphan units/blocks, such as Half and Quarter Square Triangles, Nine Patch blocks, etc., just like in Mary's quilts shown above, but, that would have meant more piecing for you if you didn't have the same blocks.  I felt I was already taking a risk inviting you on this unusual piecing journey, so I asked you to just use your scraps, hopefully spending no money, and not too much of your valuable time.  The tucked part of the quilt won't be seen, so you might wonder, why piece anything at all?  Why not just use plain fabric?  Good question, and you certainly can, but.....I really wanted to do as our quilting ancestors would have, and I'm so glad I did. I thought they would not have wasted a large piece of fabric on something that wouldn't be seen, and would have chosen to pieced random scraps for the job instead.  That's how I imagine it, anyway.  

By now, you know why I named this sew-along Tucker.  Hope it makes you smile!  My next Tucker quilt will likely use a large orphan block leftover from another quilt project.  Isn't that a great use of a large, leftover orphan block?  


In case you're not loving my Tucker idea, please know that I am sorry.  I tried to forewarn everyone from the beginning that it would not be my typical sew-along, and to prepare you.  If you have cut and sewn your scraps thus far, all is not lost!  With a little un-sewing of your patchwork squares, you can add to them to make another star block, and create a little table runner.  I hope that eases your disappointment!!  

My apologies for the unusually long blog post, but I had a story to tell you!  I would really, really love to know what you think about Tucker quilts.  Yes, it's a term I've coined and hope it will continue.  

I'd love it if  you'd leave me a comment with your feedback, I will choose one winner to receive a Fat Eighth bundle of one of my fabric collections.  And, I most definitely want to hear all comments...favorable, and non-favorable.  I'll choose a winner November 14th.  

I've also added a little poll to the side-bar of my blog, so click here to cast your vote in the poll. It will be fun to see what you all think!  

I will also host an Airing of The Quilts for Tucker on December 15th.  So, please email a photo to me (as an attachment) to Pam@HeartspunQuilts.com.  (Your quilt top need only be pieced. It doesn't have to be bound.)  

I'd also love for you to post your Tucker quilt using #TuckerQuilts on social media!  

It has been my pleasure to take this Journey with you all, and I thank you so much for sewing along with me once again!  I appreciate all your comments, your emails, and your business, and hope to be able to continue sharing things with you for a long time!  

Now...it's my turn to wait to see what you think and what your Tucker Quilt looks like!    

Piecefully Yours.....






102 comments:

  1. I love it! What a great idea. I have places in my house that would love to have a Tucker. I think I know just where I'm going to put my Tucker just as soon as I finish this last step. It had needed a little quilt for a long time but every little quilt I tried there was just too big. I also love the way we used scraps and orphan blocks. Thanks. Mary Ellen

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  2. What a cute, cute idea! I suspect we all have a place or two that could use a little Tucker. I haven't been feeling well enough to take on a new project, but I did save the steps so I can make a Tucker when I'm feeling better. After all, I *have* to make one ... if for no other reason that my youngest grandson is named Tucker. ha! Seriously ... thanks for sharing your creativity with all of us.

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  3. I'm in the midst of moving and setting up my sewing room, but I can't wait to make my little 'Tucker' quilt. I think the idea is charming. I have less storage in my new home, but there will be a place for him.

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  4. Pam,
    Thank you for putting this sew-along together. I really enjoyed the "snapshot" of our quilting past and seeing how this little quilt was coming together. It is a very sweet little quilt. It makes wonder what other quilt blocks that the little quilt maker was learning to make.

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  5. So very clever, the quilt itself, the name and the concept of a little quilt to tuck in here and there. I have several places that could use a little Tucker. Thank you for sharing this idea! And NEVER apologize for creativity!!

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  6. Like everyone else that has commented, I too love this little quilt and especially the idea behind it. I know I will be creating several little "Tucker's" to place around my home as soon as my holiday gifts are done. Thank you so much for your creative ideas and sharing them with us.

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  7. So cute... it's a delightful little quilt! I love things like this around the house.. little sparks of color and pattern where we might not expect them. And a great use of orphans... don't they deserve to shine too?? :-) BTW - love that Wing Clipper ruler - it is awesome!

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  8. This was a delightful quilt along! I am so pleased with the outcome and your story just adds to the project. The end product was a refreshing change, with all sorts of possibilities for other 'Tuckers'.
    Thank you so much from carol at artlessfabrications dot com

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  9. Hi Pam, no, non sono per niente delusa dal risultato del Tucker: è bello come me lo immaginavo.
    La storia è molto bella e interessante, e anch'io mi trovo a collezionare vecchi oggetti e ad immaginare come venivano usati e le storie e la vita di chi li usava, mi sento legata al passato dei miei antenati.
    Quindi grazie per aver condiviso con noi questi bei pensieri.
    Un abbraccio.

    Ivana

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  10. Tucker is wonderful with the star and flying geese. I use the Wing Clipper also and no longer avoid flying geese : ) This little quilt is just right - thanks again for a great pattern and story.

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  11. I thought Tucker looked unbalanced when viewed horizontally but I love how it looks vertically. I love that we used scraps, after all , we have plenty. I like your discussion about why you made Tucker the way you did and why. It makes perfect sense to me. I think I will definitely make more like this using my orphan blocks and making do. Thanks for the inspiration and sewalong.

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  12. I think its a great idea, and very cute! I can think of several places in my house where a little quilt like that could be tucked right in! Thanks for sharing the pattern and the interesting background information.

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  13. I love Tucker and can see how leaving the batting out would work well for some displays. I have a box full of 1 1/2" pieces just ready for a project like this.

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  14. I love it!! I'm still working on the star, but loving how it's coming together. I had some 1-1/2" squares with no inspiration on how to use them until I saw Tucker. Thanks for sharing, and I love the story behind this little quilt!

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  15. Hi, Pam! This little "Tucker" quilt is darling and mine will remain exactly how you planned it. I wouldn't change a thing. The sewalong was fun because it was doable in a short amount of time and not an overwhelming project. Am anxious to see what you come up with next. I met you at your guild's quilt show about a year or two ago. We happen to share a special physician who I worked for for 20 years before retiring. Also, did anyone else notice that the Wing Clipper ruler was created by Deb Tucker? How ironic and appropriate for the occasion! Best wishes, Eileen

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  16. I, too, enjoyed the Tucker sew along. The concept of using what we have at hand to create something useful and beautiful is so fun. Thank you Pam for taking us on this adventure.

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  17. I love it! I think it's a wonderful reminder of our quilting history and the make-do attitude of sewers past :) It's super sweet! Thank you for sharing it with us!

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  18. Hi, Pam. What a clever idea. I have plenty of places for a Tucker in my home. My problem is that I made it wrong to start with (mine isn't a star), so I may rearrange the final units in order to make the whole thing look intentional, instead of the mistake that it was.
    I think your Tucker looks great--and I wish my laundry room looked that nice! *LOL*

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  19. I love the idea,--nice to have more ideas for displaying quilts.

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  20. No disappointment here!! I LOVE it!!! Off to finish up!!

    Blessings and hugs!

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  21. I went to bed last night thinking that we would finally get to see the finished Tucker. I know, "get a life". Those remaining pieces had me stymied -OK, flying geese - makes sense. Can't wait to finish it. My stack of firkins could use a Tucker or perhaps one of my crocks or perhaps the drawer of my thread cabinet. You can see what is in my future - more Tuckers!

    Thanks, Pam, for sharing your ideas and creativity. Enjoyed seeing more of your antiques.

    Charlotte

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  22. I really think this is fun and I love your tucker pattern very much. And a great way to display too. I always love ways to use up those scraps and love it when they turn into semething beautiful! Pleas more...lol!
    Hugs from Switzerland, Martina

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  23. Your little quilts are such a joy to see and sew. Love your name for it. So appropriate. Thank you for all you do.

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  24. Your little quilts are such a joy to see and sew. Love your name for it. So appropriate. Thank you for all you do.

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  25. I too have been wanting to make some small quilts that will fit in limited space. So your Tucker will work just great. Not everyone has to like everything. That's what gives us variety. It would just be nice if when someone doesn't like something they say it respectfully or not say anything at all. Thank you for another great project.

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  26. I love Little Tucker -- what a fun name for a delightful little quilt! I couldn't figure out what it was going to be - a pleasant surprise! I enjoyed seeing your antiques, and the different ideas for display. Thanks so much!

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  27. I love it but I also love all things early American and doll quilts ar a fave they have so many uses. Thank you for a fun mystery quilt that truely remained a mystery to me.

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  28. I couldn't imagine where you were going with this little project, so I've been looking forward to the reveal. What fun! And what a great idea for letting our little orphan blocks shine. Thanks!

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  29. Well, I love it and what a great idea. I sometimes like to tuck a little quilt here or there but always feel bad that I am hiding some great piecing elements on the quilt. You have hit a home run with this one.

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  30. I Love your little Tucker in every way. I have been cutting my squares but I have to admit that I have been waiting to see the finished quilt before I started to sew everything together. I should not have doubted but I discovered I have a hard time with mysteries. I need to see it first to make it. I wanted to try and use my blue and white scraps. I never would have expected the flying geese : ) Thanks for the fun and a chance at the giveaway. Janita

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  31. I think your Tucker idea is amazing! It seems to be a perfect solution to your decorating! Thank you so much for sharing your idea and pattern!!!

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  32. I think Tucker is a wonderful idea! I also see a really cute table runner with a little more sewing, the ideas are endless. Thanks.

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  33. Tucker is a wonderful design for someone who has a lot of places to tuck little quilts like that, and I like how you've displayed it. It's very cute. :)

    However, I don't have any place in my apartment to tuck a quilt into, so I'm going to redesign it into a wallhanging. I like your design with the 2 stars separated by the flying geese strip, but I've come up with a different design that uses all of the pieces for Tucker plus some more dark squares. I've only got as far as finishing the star block and cutting out the squares for the rectangle block, so I won't have to do any unsewing -- just some rearranging. I'm glad now that I was so far behind. :)

    As always, I've enjoyed the sew-along, and thank you for taking the time to put it together. Tucker may not work for my particular situation, but I'm going to end up with a cute little quilt that I probably wouldn't have made otherwise. :) And never apologize for your designs being different. This would be a boring world if everything and everybody were the same.

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  34. I love the tucker block and your story of why you came up with the name. I also enjoyed reading about where your inspiration came from. I have a feeling my tucker quilt will be tucked round a doll in her cot when my granddaughter. sees it. Thank you Pam

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  35. Thank you for this sew-along. I have really enjoyed making Tucker and will have many places where I can display it and maybe a few others made from more of my small scraps.
    maureeneh52@hotmail.com

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  36. Thank you for the fun little sew-along. Love the unbalanced look, I need to be off balance more! This is my first sew-along with you, but it will not be my last. Thanks for the opportunity to win!

    Gina in Missouri
    hared@iland.net

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  37. Your Tucker quilt is adorable. Loved the lengthy post with its story and the reason for being. Thank you for yet another inspiring project!

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  38. I love it! Clever idea, creative thoughts and lovely quilt. I can't wait to finish mine. Thank you.

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  39. Oh Pam ~ Your Tucker is absolutely precious ! I just love to decorate my home with little quilts.
    Please keep them coming...I promise to never get tuckered out : )

    Joan in AZ

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  40. Loved making Tucker. I love making old fashion doll quilts.

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  41. Loved making Tucker. I love making old fashion doll quilts.

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  42. Hello Pam,
    Your Tucker is so beautiful and the story too!
    It was really a joy to open my scrap boxes. I keep all scraps even the tiny ones! Some were given by a friend.
    I sew it by hand and take the time to see it grow slowly. Each litlle piece of fabric has its own story...
    Thanks a lot for this sew along!
    Ghislaine in France

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  43. Pam, I love it! I enjoy your sew alongs and always look forward to trying something different!

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  44. I'm just reading your post now,matter being away for the day, and having seen this step yet, but I wanted you to know I love it, too. It's precious.

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  45. Pam, this is a lovely little piece that had me wondering about the origins of an Australianism for food "tucker", as in "bush tucker". I wouldn't mind betting that the derivation had something to do with a piece of fabric being "tucked" under the chin to catch food spills dribbles - something like a napkin or a bib.

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  46. Thank you for sharing another wonderful sew-along with us. I love the sweet quilt, and the history behind it. I can't wait to finish it and "tuck" it somewhere. I have a cat named Tucker, because he always liked to tuck behind things in high places when we first got him. Now, I will have a quilt and a cat that share the same name.

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  47. Thank you for sharing another wonderful sew-along with us. I love the sweet quilt, and the history behind it. I can't wait to finish it and "tuck" it somewhere. I have a cat named Tucker, because he always liked to tuck behind things in high places when we first got him. Now, I will have a quilt and a cat that share the same name.

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  48. It is darling and will fit so may places in my home.. thank you

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  49. I love, love, LOVE Tucker...and the table runner versions, too! Thanks so much for sharing this pattern with us. !!!! LOVE IT !!!!

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  50. Thank you for taking us on this sweet sew-along! Tucker turned out beautifully....

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  51. Disappointed, gosh no! You touched my heart with your vision and your story. I think "Tucker" is perfect for so many of us who love exactly like you do Pam<3 I know you have inspired me yet again, and I will finish my "Tucker" and have thoughts of many more like "Tucker" to be throughout my home too! I also love your grain scoop: ))

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  52. I didn't read ahead, so when you showed the Wing Clipper, I thought Tucker must have something to do with Deb Tucker--lol! Maybe a pocket to hold rulers? I think tucking Tucker is brilliant and I can hardly wait to finish mine and start testing out places in my home to use it. Thanks for a fun little project--I may need to make a couple more!

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  53. Absolutely love Tucker, here in Australia tucker is food, especially some of our wonderful native bush tucker! Can't wait to finish mine....you are so generous too share your sewalongs! Thankyou for a wonderful project!

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  54. No disappointment here. I love this little quilt. I also love early American history, and learned a lot in this QAL. Will be finishing up my Tucker asap, and post it on my blog. Will send you a photo of it as well. Thank you again for the information and this fun event :)

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  55. Love this little quilt. I just finished it while at a quilting retreat

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  56. Pam,
    I have really enjoyed doing this little "Tucker" with you. I've waited anxiously today to get this part in my e-mail but it didn't come so I went to your blog and it was there. So now I can get to work and finish it.
    This is the first time I've made myself keep up with a quilt-along. I always let "life" get in my way of sticking to something to completion. Usually I don't even get started. I loved the article in "American Patchwork and Quilting" featuring your home and how you display your many quilts. We have had our old farmhouse for 46 years (I've only been here for 43 of them), since I started seriously making quilts about 15 years ago, I've tried to incorporate them into my decorating. I will send a picture of my Tucker when it's done and my granddaughter shows me how to put a picture in an e-mail. Thank you so much for taking the time to do this for us.

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  57. Love, love, love the Tucker! A great way to use up scraps, but also a great idea to take my own orphan/leftover blocks and create my own Tucker!!

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  58. I love your tucker quilt so much! I must make it! I did my own version of your Mary G. quilt. I'll send you a pic.

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  59. I love your tucker quilt so much! I must make it! I did my own version of your Mary G. quilt. I'll send you a pic.

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  60. I love Tucker , I think it is wonderful how you have used the little quilts as inspiration which in turn has inspired each of us to make one of these darling quilts .

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  61. Pam - I really love your tucker quilt, and you've found such creative and charming ways to display it! I didn't make one as I just discovered your blog, but may in the future.
    I have a few antique dolls and would love to make quilts for them!

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  62. I don't know that I would make Tucker as you did. I just don't have the right space for it now. I do like the table runner option and when I get the chance that is what I will make. Thanks for sharing,

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  63. I love it! Love the project, the idea, and your coined name makes perfect sense. A whole new quilt genre is born!

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  64. Love the Tucker pattern. Not up to date on it but will definitely be finishing it.

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  65. I loved your story about the reasoning behind tucker. What a neat idea.
    zollj@bpsnetworks.com

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  66. I have enjoyed this little mystery! The amount of piecing each week was just right and it was fun to see the parts grow. Mjhenrichs@aol.com

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  67. II think "tucker" is a great idea- there are so many places that you can put little quilts to help brighten up an area plus we are using fabric we love

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  68. I love your little Tucker quilt. It's adorable! I also LOVE your fabrics, I can't wait for your new lines to come out. Thanks for sharing the pattern. I want to make one.
    Lisa
    traditionalquilter@gmail.com

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  69. I have really enjoyed this sew-along. I now will be looking at my orphan blocks to possibly make more future "Tuckers". Thanks for the mystery and the story behind it.

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  70. I've never done any quilt along until you talked about the tucker project. It was great and I couldn't wait for the next Friday to get here for my next instruction. Thank you for taking the time to do this with your followers. Have a wonderful weekend.
    Misti, November 6 at 10:25 PM

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  71. I like the Tucker quilt. I like to tuck things around too.

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  72. I loved making this little quilt! Love the idea and story!

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  73. I found your blog just in time to start this quilt-a-long and boy did I look forward to Fridays!! Mine is done except the binding and I'm looking around the house for a perfect spot. Thank you so much for sharing - creating this :)
    Sandie Mixa

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  74. I LOVE IT! I never thought about it before but there are lots of places around my house that could use a little "tucker" quilt...now just deciding were this first one will go will be a challenge...too many possibilities.

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  75. Fun little quilt. thanks for letting me play along--I've lots of places to tuck a wee quilt!

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  76. This Tucker quilt has been such fun to make. Thanks for sharing a bit of history and showing us how the technique can still be very useful. The bonus was being able to make the whole thing from scraps. Thanks for making Friday's extra fun...Ursula

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  77. THIS WAS MORE FUN THEN A ,"BARREL OF MONKEYS"' !!! I enjoyed all of our dates immensely and could not wait for the next one.I finished up my binding this evening and now I am going to find, "TUCKER", it's perfect place in my home. It was really nice to sneak off from my other projects to work on this and didn't even feel a little bit guilty�� Just want to take the time to, THANK YOU FOR ALL THE TIME YOU TOOK FROM YOUR BUSY LIFE TO GIVE US A TON OF FUN☃��❄️����
    HUGS,
    Darla

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  78. I love your idea! You are very creative. Such a delight!

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  79. I think it's great. Mine isn't done yet but I'll work on it. Not eveything has to be a perfect little quilt or wallhanging. It would make a lovely gift for someone who loves the idea of quilts but might not give it the TLC that we would. Thanks for a little surprise every week.

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  80. A surprise ending to Tucker and I love it. I have the perfect spot for this little beauty. Thank you for sharing with us and the information on using the tucker trimmer and the history tour that was your inspiration. I have done many of your mystery sew-a-longs. You never fail to inspire us. As an added bonus, no quilting required. Let's do more of these.

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  81. Am so glad I found your blog. I love your style and history inspiration. Have made your blog one I follow daily. Tucker was great. I do all by hand and love little projects I can take with me. Wasn't sure at first until the reveal. Thought was off balance until saw how you used this little cutie. Great ideas, just what I need.

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  82. What a lovely story, and your "Tucker" quilt is wonderful. thank you so much for sharing!! Please do not apologize for such a terrific blog post. I did not make the quilt yet, but plan to in the future. Bring on more "Tucker" quilts. I have a collection of antique baby doll quilts. I started collecting them about 20 years ago.

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  83. Your Tucker quilt is wonderful! I wish I could make one right now, but watching the 3 grandsons and now eye surgery, I can only look forward to making one in the future. Your design is creative and I love it!!
    Thank you, Jan

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  84. I just love the journeys you plan. You have a wonderful way of using words to make us aware of our heritage. I did not grow up among quilts or quilters but I love them and the symbolism they represent. I follow your blog because I enjoy your creations.

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  85. I too am still cutting my squares but wanted to say how much I love this little quilt! The story behind it makes it even more endearing. I have just the place to tuck my quilt when it is finished ! I love reading your blog.

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  86. Pam, I love your "tucker" quilt and the entire concept! I've learned so much from you, in your posts and your quilt stories. This is a fabulous idea! You go girl!

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  87. I love your little Tucker quilt! It is just what I need to add a little inspiration to the little places in my home. As an added plus, I enjoy the history.
    Thanks so much for this little "tucker" and I look forward to seeing more! .

    Take care.

    Emily
    eppie.doodle@yahoo.com

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  88. I think it's perfect and adorable, it also gives us inspiration at the same time to break out of the box and utilize this thought into our own lives. Thank you for your openness and the little bits of your story that were shared. I'm sure this lil' beauty will be admired and create many smiles for years and years to come. Again, thanks!

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  89. Greetings from Northern Saskatchewan Canada
    I love your little tucker quilt! A quick and relatively easy, very fun project!!
    You always manage to inspire us and challenge us! Keep up the great work!!!

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  90. What an awesome idea. I love the look. Your humble laundry room sure looks nicer than my humble space but at least I am not down at the river doing laundry! :-)

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  91. I love little Tucker! This was an enjoyable stitch along, thank you so much

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  92. Love the idea of "Tucker" and just trying to decide if I'm using Civil War scraps or 30's scraps! (Your laundry room pictures were an inspiration for my laundry room) Thanks, as always, for sharing your amazing talents and inspirations! :)

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  93. What a successful blog! Tucker should have a friend on another wall in the laundry room. I liked working with scraps for a change. I was much more relaxed with a small quilt. Keep the momentum going!

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  94. What a successful blog! Tucker should have a friend on another wall in the laundry room. I liked working with scraps for a change. I was much more relaxed with a small quilt. Keep the momentum going!

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  95. Cute, cute, cute! too bad most of my orphan blocks are much bigger-will just have to make bigger table runners or mats or placemats, I guess!

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  96. What a neat story! Yes, the story is what I love about this whole sequence -- and the history you shared along the way. The darling quilt, as a result, is just icing on the cake! Who wouldn't love Tucker???

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  97. I love how you were inspired to make Tucker! I ran out of pre-cut scraps half way through Part Three and had been waiting for the reveal to decide what else I might cut. In the spirit of make-do, I'm now free to finish it with whatever I might have laying around which is cool because I think I have some HSTs I can throw in! I also need to find a display spot which may inspire some more inventive piecing!

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  98. It's wonderful! I love the tucking idea!
    I was inspired to finish mine a little differently and hope to finish it in time for the airing of the tuckers!

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  99. Had so much fun making this Pam! Just posted to IG and emailed my pic to you. Thanks for the continued inspiration!!

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  100. Love it too Pam, such a great idea!! I didn't get time to make it while everyone else sewed along - but will!!!!

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  101. I love your idea of No batting. The Tucker will be fun to have to Tuck over a rail on a shelf I have. Thanks SEW much for sharing the cute antique quilts from Mary. I was out of town when you posted part 4. Going to get a quick finish with this one. NO Quilting to be done. YEA!

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  102. I really enjoy sewing this little top. Quickly done with my scraps.
    Thank you Pam .

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